Selecting Your Candle Glassware

Candles can be traced back to biblical times. For hundreds of years they were the only source of light in people’s homes, the earliest of which were made with tallow. It was not until the 1800’s that paraffin replaced this.

A hundred years later and electricity replaced candles, with candles being relegated to fulfilling other roles such as decoration for festive occasions, for the calm and sanctity they evoke in religious ceremonies and the general mood of warmth, relaxation and even romance.

One of the most important aspects of making container candles is of course the selection of that container, so we are presenting some tips for you.

Jar & Container Selection

Soy wax alone can only be used in jars due to the softness and melting point of the wax. There is an endless variety of jars you can choose from and once you get the candle-making bug, all containers will be looked at in a very different way.  Half the fun is finding new and interesting jars & containers.

There are numerous jar suppliers in Victoria and interstate, so get catalogues from all of them, compare sizes, prices, minimum orders & payment terms. Easy to do with Internet access. (Suppliers, listed)

Purchasing through jar suppliers means all the hard work has been done for you by selecting the glass that is suitable for your candles.

However, if you do want to source your own here are some tips:

1/ A good candle container should have a diameter wide enough so that it can be lit and extinguished easily. This also means that the fragrance throw will be better even if the candle is not lit.

2/ Jars with lids retain the fragrance for longer and prevent dust and debris from falling into the candle. The purpose of the lid is NOT to put your candle out, so do not extinguish a candle by placing the lid on.

3/      Do not use fine glassware such as champagne glasses for candles. They may look great but they are not made to withstand a high temperature. And as the glass is quite thin, they retain a lot of heat making them very hot to handle as well as prone to cracking.

4/      One of the reason metal containers have become very popular as Travel Tins is because they are unbreakable. Remember to source tins that are seamless. Some with joints can leak when the wax is hot. Hazardous when you are pouring and hazardous for your customers if they leak when being burnt. Apart from getting wax all over the surface they are sitting on, they can also become a fire hazard. If you are unsure, test it by filling it with water and letting it sit for a couple of days. I have recently purchased seamed tins that are suitable for paints and chemicals. I know from their use that these would be safe for the soy wax.

5/ Ceramic is popular for feature items or a table centre piece as they can match the décor. Even old teacups can be used to add the “vintage” look.

6/ Jars that have a wide neck and a narrow base can cause problems when the candle is nearing the end. As the base is narrower, it means the wick is closer to the sides. This will result in a very hot jar and a jar that is normally fine may become prone to cracking due to excessive heat.

7/ Silverware is popular for special events such as anniversaries.

 If you are unsure of the suitability of a candle, test it first before offering it to family or friend.

SUMMARY

DON’T USEDO USE

Champagne glasses                                                                        sturdy, heat resistant

Unsealed terracotta                                                                        Metal e.g. silverware

Odd shaped glassware                                                                   China e.g. teacups

Wide at top, narrow                                                                        Sealed terracotta pots

at bottom                                                                                           Glassware from supplier

Seamless tin ware

Mason Jars ( preserving Jars)

 

http://www.soy-candles.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

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